All I want for Christmas …

 

a-peace

 

 

Photo: Jeremy Atkinson via Instagram ift.tt/1YEQ5eM and Creative Commons.

Advertisements

Day for Girls — Oct. 11

In a time when too many people still see girls and women as objects or possessions, let us strive to educate humanity to see each girl as a human being who has aptitude, capability and sensibility. Let us make a better place for our daughters, granddaughters, nieces and friends to become full, contributing members of this global community.

— Tanya Goodman

 

On 22 April 2015, children in classroom at the opening of a new education centre for Syrian children in Kahramanmaras. The UNICEF-supported education centre was built in partnership with the Turkish Disaster and Emergency Management Authority (AFAD) and the Ministry of National Education, with financial support from the European Commission.

On 22 April 2015, children in classroom at the opening of a new education centre for Syrian children in Kahramanmaras. The UNICEF-supported education centre was built in partnership with the Turkish Disaster and Emergency Management Authority (AFAD) and the Ministry of National Education, with financial support from the European Commission.

Secretary-General’s Message for 2016

 

The theme of this year’s International Day of the Girl is based on the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals. The slogan is: Girls’ Progress equals Goals’ Progress: What Counts for Girls.

The well-being, human rights and empowerment of the world’s 1.1 billion girls are central to achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda. When we agreed on that agenda, we promised girls quality education and health services.

We committed to ending discrimination and violence against girls, and harmful practices like child marriage. We pledged to leave no one behind.
Too often, in villages, shanty towns and refugee camps around the world, girls are the ones left behind: without nutritious food, healthcare or quality education, and at risk of sexual violence.

Investing in girls is both the right thing to do, and the smart thing to do. It has a powerful ripple effect across all areas of development, and reaches forward to future generations.
But what cannot be measured cannot be managed. If we do not gather the data we need, we will never know if we are delivering on our promises.

We need to make sure that our initiatives are reaching all girls: girls in extreme poverty; girls in isolated rural areas; girls living with disabilities; girls in indigenous communities; girls who are refugees or displaced within their own countries.

Timely, high-quality data is vital so that we know where we are meeting our promises, and where we are falling behind. Let us all work hard to make sure we count all girls, because all girls count.

Ban Ki-moon

 

Photo: ©UNICEF/UN019130/Ergen

Honoring International Day of Peace

A message worth repeating, “Let us pledge to teach our children the value of tolerance and mutual respect.”

inspirit*ational

Let us honor peace within and outside ourselves. May there be peace in our hearts so we may have peace in our dwellings and in our world.

“On this International Day of Peace, let us pledge to teach our children the value of tolerance and mutual respect.  Let us invest in the schools and International Peaceteachers that will build a fair and inclusive world that embraces diversity.  Let us fight for peace and defend it with all our might.” UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

The United Nations invites all nations and people to honor a cessation of hostilities during this International Day of Peace, Sept. 21.

View original post

Day of Democracy 2016

The United Nations has declared September 15 as the International Day of Democracy.

Voters proudly display their registration cards as they wait to vote in the first peaceful, democratic presidential elections in Haiti's history (1990).

Voters proudly display their registration cards as they wait to vote in the first peaceful, democratic presidential elections in Haiti’s history (1990).

Democracy and voting are very much on the minds of U.S. citizens now. Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, will be the 58th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Putting it politely, it has been an unusual campaign season. Who will win the popular vote? Who will the members of the electoral college choose?

The right to vote is essential to any democracy. With that right comes a duty. You have to register to vote and actually cast a ballot. Simple enough, or isn’t it? I have learned the stories of many people, from many countries, who have faced intimidation and death to be able to secure the right to vote.

That is why I am always puzzled to hear some young people say they are not planning to vote. Many say it is because they don’t like the choice of candidates or they don’t believe one vote will make a difference. If you feel your choice is limited now, wait until you have someone else’s choice thrust upon you. Remember, sometimes a single vote can make the difference between winning and losing. Most of all, never forget the power of one vote (and like-minded votes) multiplied one million times or more.

For those in the United Sates who are interested in registering to vote visit: http://www.rockthevote.com/

UN Photo|Milton Grant